How To Grow Fresh Air: 50 House Plants that Purify Your Home or Office

This book, by B. C. Wolverton, caught my attention for two reasons.  The first is I just like the idea of ‘growing’ fresh air.  Electric air purifiers are great to have, and in my own family we did decide to buy one. It cost $300, which is considered low compared to some of the purifiers out there, I know.  But plants can be free!

The other reason the book got my attention is my goal to help others know that they can have a better quality of life by working with what already exists.  And plants are all around us.  A better quality of life is not necessarily about money.  It’s often about our decisions.

If you have a home with a front or back yard, you have free plants.  The possibilities, ways, and methods of bringing them inside so they will purify your air, are endless.  I have found baby pine trees sprouting in my yard.  It’s fun and interesting to pot them, bring them inside and see what develops.  Even something that would be classified as a weed can be turned into an intriguing indoor plant.  Get creative and bring in what looks beautiful to you.  Don’t worry about what anyone else thinks of your plant choices.  Just do it.

I’m sure you have heard about chemical emissions and how they are inside of our homes and buildings.  We can clean it up with plants and fresh, circulating air.  How To Grow Fresh Air: 50 House Plants That Purify Your Home or Office offers practical, to-the-point information.  Here is an excerpt from the book:

How pure is the air you breathe?

Plants are the lungs of the earth: they produce the oxygen that makes life possible, add precious moisture, and filter toxins. Houseplants can perform these essential functions in your home or office with the same efficiency as a rainforest in our biosphere.

In research designed to create a breathable environment for a NASA lunar habitat, noted scientist Dr. B.C. Wolverton discovered that houseplants are the best filters of common pollutants such as ammonia, formaldehyde, and benzene. Hundreds of these poisonous chemicals can be released by furniture, carpets, and building material, and then trapped by closed ventilation systems, leading to the host of respiratory and allergic reactions now called Sick Building Syndrome. In this full-color, easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Wolverton shows you how to grow and nurture 50 plants as accessible and trouble-free as the tulip and the Boston fern, and includes many beautiful but commonly found varieties not generally thought of as indoor plants. He also rates each plant for its effectiveness in removing pollutants, and its ease of growth and maintenance.

Studies show that Americans spend ninety percent of their lives indoors, which means that good indoor air quality is vital for good health. How to Grow Fresh Air will show you how to purify the environment that has the most impact on you.

All plants clean the air, but for a specific list of plants that do the best job, add this book to your own personal library.

Have any creative ways you have brought plants inside?  Please leave a comment and thank you for reading.

 

 

 

 

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.